Extended two-year warranty: The quality inspections, coverage and care that comes with skid steer warranties is hard to beat. Caterpillar's twenty-four-month or 2,000-hours warranty offers twice the coverage on compact machines like skid steers, protecting against unexpected repairs or maintenance. What's more, Cat Financial Services bolsters warranties with a complete suite of Equipment Protection Plans (EPP), customizable when starting at 36 months, as well as Customer Support Agreements and Engine Warranty Registration.
Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."
You can also contact us for more information and to inquire about maintenance requirements and efficiency ratings. We’re proud to offer the advanced lineup of Cat skid steer loaders for sale and know that we have the right model for your business. Simply let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll point you in the right direction. Cat skid steer loaders come in a range of sizes and capacities to fit all loads, tasks and budgets.
There are currently eight different models of Cat skid steers. Loaders are available with a net flywheel power capacity ranging from 47 hp to 106 hp, and a rated operating capacity from 1400 lbs. to an impressive 3700 lbs. Some models are equipped with Cat C3.8 and Cat C3.3B DIT turbocharged engines for additional power and performance. All Cat skid steer loaders are designed for easy serviceability, so you keep your machine properly maintained and in peak operating condition at all times.

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The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
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