The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only 6 ft. tall and 3 ft. wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine.
Zupancic says it's all about the size of the site and the use the skid steer is put to. "These construction and jobsite applications require a little more power and bucket size, but are still in a confined enough space that contractors cannot bring in the big machines," he explains. "Sometimes the operator doesn't need the extra muscle of a larger skid-steer loader and finds it more economical to have a 50- to 70-hp machine."
Jobsite dimensions are one of the greatest factors to know to fit the skid steer to the job. "Understanding physical limitations of the work area often dictates the class that may be used in the application," says Dennis Turney, Hyundai Construction Equipment. "The next consideration would be the lifting height or dumping height requirement, along with the capacity of the job. Finally, hydraulic capacity needs to known in order to operate any hydraulic attachments.
Growing businesses looking to get the best return on their investment can benefit from purchasing a used Cat skid steer loader from Butler Machinery. The cost savings of buying used puts the legendary quality and performance of Cat equipment within reach of smaller and medium-sized organizations on a limited budget. In today’s economy, it takes the best equipment to serve your clients as diligently as possible while maintaining low overhead costs — Cat skid steer loaders deliver low costs of ownership and unbeatable uptime. Many of our newer pre-owned units are still under the original manufacturer’s warranty. For older units, preventative maintenance plans and extended warranties are available to keep your purchase running its best without breaking the bank.
Unlike in a conventional front loader, the lift arms in these machines are alongside the driver with the pivot points behind the driver's shoulders. Because of the operator's proximity to moving booms, early skid loaders were not as safe as conventional front loaders, particularly during entry and exit of the operator. Modern skid loaders have fully enclosed cabs and other features to protect the operator. Like other front loaders, it can push material from one location to another, carry material in its bucket or load material into a truck or trailer.
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