Standard-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. A standard-flow system commonly ranges from around 17-25 gallons per minute (gpm). It is the auxiliary system you'll find automated on nearly all skid steer models. These auxiliary systems work in tangent to power the most common unit attachments. Think accessories like buckets, hydraulic augers and hammers, with pressurizations averaging 3,000-3,500 pounds per square inch (psi).
An extended reach design uses multiple hinges and parallel lifting bars on the loader arm, with the main pivot points towards the center or front of the machine. This allows the loader arm to have much greater operating height while retaining a compact design, and allows the vertical movement to be less of an arc and more straight-up vertical, to keep the bucket forward of the operator's cab, allowing safe dumping into tall containers or vehicles.
*Offer valid through March 2018 on leases for select compact construction machines. Offer available for qualifying customers in Ohio CAT sales territory only and cannot be combined with any other offers. Financing and published payment amounts are subject to credit approval through Cat Financial. Offer subject to machine availability. Models, work tools, and configurations shown do not necessarily reflect the exact model configuration used for promotional pricing. Payments are based on a tax lease with 0% downpayment. Lease provides 500 hours/year usage. Payments do not include tax, freight, set-up, document fees. Contact Ohio CAT for full details.
The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.

Who likes dropping or spilling materials? No one. That’s why CASE’s innovative Ride Control™ feature is such a benefit. Just push a button to automatically steady the loader arm when traveling at elevated speeds and the machine automatically compensates with greater shock absorption and reduced loader arm bounce, so you can work faster than ever without spilling your load.
No over-digging. No undercutting. No wasted time, fuel or dollars. SiteControl helps eliminate rework by making reliable, repeatable precision a reality. CASE offers tailor-made hardware and software solutions for all positioning and measuring tasks in construction, including ways for businesses to improve productivity and lower costs – both on and off your machine.
The 272D XHP and 299D XHP high-flow models make 106 hp and 277 lbs.-ft. peak torque. Rated operating capacity is 3,600 lbs. for the 272D XHP and 3,185 lbs. for the 299D XHP at 35 percent of tipping load. Operating weight for the 272D XHP is 9,304 lbs. and 11,647 lbs. for the 299D XHP. Hydraulic systems deliver 40 gpm of flow at 4,061 psi, producing 94 hydraulic horsepower.
Standard-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. A standard-flow system commonly ranges from around 17-25 gallons per minute (gpm). It is the auxiliary system you'll find automated on nearly all skid steer models. These auxiliary systems work in tangent to power the most common unit attachments. Think accessories like buckets, hydraulic augers and hammers, with pressurizations averaging 3,000-3,500 pounds per square inch (psi).
Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."
Hammers: Hammers ensure you never have to worry about breaking through hard surfaces on the job again. From sheetrock to concrete, hammers are designed for hard-hitting impact at high blows per minute while absorbing vibrational recoil that may reach the side steer. Many hammers, new and used, even feature automatic shut-off and sound-buffering capabilities for safety and noise control.

Usage: Consider all the details of your project and what you expect to use the skid steer for, from loading and hauling to drilling, boring or excavation. How many hours a day will the steer be used, and what are the operating load weights or capacities you'll need to match expected workloads? Does your desired unit have an engine model and horsepower fitting your projected use?
Outfitting new and old equipment with Tier 4's suite of equipment technology is another way to improve the lifespan and efficiency of a skid steer purchase. Tier 4 Technology brings innovative, personalized upgrades to the engine electronics, fuel and air systems of a unit, explicitly based on that unit's engine size, routine tasks and jobsite location.
The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only 6 ft. tall and 3 ft. wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine.
Rated operating capacity for the 272D is 3,200 lbs., and for the 299D it is 2,975 lbs. at 35 percent of tipping load. Capacity for the 299D rated at 50 percent of tipping load is 4,250 lbs. An optional counterweight kit increases rated operating capacity of these machines to 3,450 lbs. and 4,500 lbs., respectively. Operating weights are 8,404 lbs. and 10,866 lbs., respectively.
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
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