One size does not fit all when it comes to skid steers. Bigger is not universally better, while smaller units come with their own limitations and maintenance details a savvy purchaser shouldn't overlook. It's important to consult skid-steer size charts to take into account three major variables: A unit's engine model, its horsepower and its rated operating capacity (ROC).
One size does not fit all when it comes to skid steers. Bigger is not universally better, while smaller units come with their own limitations and maintenance details a savvy purchaser shouldn't overlook. It's important to consult skid-steer size charts to take into account three major variables: A unit's engine model, its horsepower and its rated operating capacity (ROC).
Outfitting new and old equipment with Tier 4's suite of equipment technology is another way to improve the lifespan and efficiency of a skid steer purchase. Tier 4 Technology brings innovative, personalized upgrades to the engine electronics, fuel and air systems of a unit, explicitly based on that unit's engine size, routine tasks and jobsite location.
Unlike in a conventional front loader, the lift arms in these machines are alongside the driver with the pivot points behind the driver's shoulders. Because of the operator's proximity to moving booms, early skid loaders were not as safe as conventional front loaders, particularly during entry and exit of the operator. Modern skid loaders have fully enclosed cabs and other features to protect the operator. Like other front loaders, it can push material from one location to another, carry material in its bucket or load material into a truck or trailer.
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