Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.
High-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. Upgrading a skid steer to a high-flow auxiliary hydraulics package means enhanced attachment options, run times and productivity. While they still operate under the same standard pressurization — 3,000-3,500 psi, they increase the pressure flow rate up to 38-40 gpm. High-flow systems can be added on to new skid steers purchased directly from a manufacturer or built into used steers. They're necessary when project attachments require high-flow rates in order to work, such as rock saws or landscaping mulchers and shredders.
An extended reach design uses multiple hinges and parallel lifting bars on the loader arm, with the main pivot points towards the center or front of the machine. This allows the loader arm to have much greater operating height while retaining a compact design, and allows the vertical movement to be less of an arc and more straight-up vertical, to keep the bucket forward of the operator's cab, allowing safe dumping into tall containers or vehicles.
Some of the biggest names in the world produce skid steer loaders, including Bobcat, New Holland and Kubota. Consider a Boxer mini skid for domestic and small-scale applications, or invest in a powerful John Deere or Caterpillar loader for commercial use.  Even if you choose to buy a second-hand machine, you have the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have bought something built to last.
Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]
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