"Interior demolition is a good example where these machines excel, as the machine is small enough to access the inside of a building, yet powerful enough to use a hydraulic breaker attachment to demolish concrete and then switch to a grapple to remove the debris," says Rostberg. "Accessing in-between houses built closely together or through backyard gates and fences is another prime example of the usefulness of this size machine."
Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."
Some of the biggest names in the world produce skid steer loaders, including Bobcat, New Holland and Kubota. Consider a Boxer mini skid for domestic and small-scale applications, or invest in a powerful John Deere or Caterpillar loader for commercial use.  Even if you choose to buy a second-hand machine, you have the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have bought something built to last.

The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only six feet tall and three feet wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine — in backyards, barns, construction sites and demolition areas. With more than 20 Bobcat® attachments to choose from, the S70 is a multi-attachment carrier that's ready to take on just about any job.

Unlike in a conventional front loader, the lift arms in these machines are alongside the driver with the pivot points behind the driver's shoulders. Because of the operator's proximity to moving booms, early skid loaders were not as safe as conventional front loaders, particularly during entry and exit of the operator. Modern skid loaders have fully enclosed cabs and other features to protect the operator. Like other front loaders, it can push material from one location to another, carry material in its bucket or load material into a truck or trailer.

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