Horsepower: A unit's power capability that equals raising 550-foot-pounds per second, or 33,000-foot-pounds per minute. A machine's horsepower identifies the maximum power amount it's able to sustain. It is the most common reading for engine types, including skid steers. Certain manufacturers may choose also to include engine power, though the definition is operationally identical.
Rakes: For land clearing, sorting, digging and aerating tasks, there are few skid-steer attachments that do as much for industrial-grade landscaping as rakes. These high-caliber pieces come in a variety of manufactured options with details tailored to your land-clearing needs. From hardened teeth to small and large-framed hoppers and grapples that collect mulch and debris, rakes are a unique attachment for any party doing heavy operational work in the outdoors.
Zupancic says it's all about the size of the site and the use the skid steer is put to. "These construction and jobsite applications require a little more power and bucket size, but are still in a confined enough space that contractors cannot bring in the big machines," he explains. "Sometimes the operator doesn't need the extra muscle of a larger skid-steer loader and finds it more economical to have a 50- to 70-hp machine."
Agriculture Attachments Brush Cutter Buckets Crusher Buckets Earth Drills Forestry Cutting Head Forks Grabs and Grapples Hydraulic Breakers Lifting Equipment Machine Mounted Compactor Machine Mounted Rollers Multiprocessors Patch Planers Quickhitch Rakes Ripper Tooth Rock Saw Rock Wheels Shovels Snow Attachments Snow Blade Stump Grinder Sweeper Collectors Tillers Tree Spade Trencher
Jobsite dimensions are one of the greatest factors to know to fit the skid steer to the job. "Understanding physical limitations of the work area often dictates the class that may be used in the application," says Dennis Turney, Hyundai Construction Equipment. "The next consideration would be the lifting height or dumping height requirement, along with the capacity of the job. Finally, hydraulic capacity needs to known in order to operate any hydraulic attachments.
Skid steers are dual-powered through their diesel engines and hydraulic pumps and systems. Hydraulic systems use pressurized, or hydraulic, fluids to power their associated machinery, rather than other fuel sources or the raw flow of materials. They're a vital component to your machine's overall output and getting the best skid for your project operations and budget.
You can also contact us for more information and to inquire about maintenance requirements and efficiency ratings. We’re proud to offer the advanced lineup of Cat skid steer loaders for sale and know that we have the right model for your business. Simply let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll point you in the right direction. Cat skid steer loaders come in a range of sizes and capacities to fit all loads, tasks and budgets.
High-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. Upgrading a skid steer to a high-flow auxiliary hydraulics package means enhanced attachment options, run times and productivity. While they still operate under the same standard pressurization — 3,000-3,500 psi, they increase the pressure flow rate up to 38-40 gpm. High-flow systems can be added on to new skid steers purchased directly from a manufacturer or built into used steers. They're necessary when project attachments require high-flow rates in order to work, such as rock saws or landscaping mulchers and shredders.
When it comes time to buy your new or used skid steer, attachments can't be an afterthought. They're engineered for specific purposes and are meant to be installed with particular steer units. When matched correctly, they complete a project in the smoothest and most efficient manner. Here, we've compiled a list of the most common skid-steer attachments for you to have on hand at your work site:

An extended reach design uses multiple hinges and parallel lifting bars on the loader arm, with the main pivot points towards the center or front of the machine. This allows the loader arm to have much greater operating height while retaining a compact design, and allows the vertical movement to be less of an arc and more straight-up vertical, to keep the bucket forward of the operator's cab, allowing safe dumping into tall containers or vehicles.
×