ASV skid-steer loaders offer state-of-the-art technology for exceptional performance, durability, and operator comfort. Unlike most other skid steer brands, the ASV models give you exceptional ground clearance and a larger departure angle at the rear bumper, so you can climb easier and work more productively in a wider range of ground conditions - a hallmark of the ASV brand.
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.

Sellers on eBay offer branded heavy machinery and construction equipment, including refurbished and older models at amazing discounts. Taking advantage of these great deals means it is possible for small businesses and homeowners to own a loader that might otherwise be too expensive. Search the extensive inventory now to find something that meets your requirements, and discover the countless ways a skid steer loader improves your operational efficiency, saving you labor, time, and money.    
Some models of skid steer now also have an automatic attachment changer mechanism. This allows a driver to change between a variety of terrain handling, shaping, and leveling tools without having to leave the machine, by using a hydraulic control mechanism to latch onto the attachments. Hydraulic supply lines to powered attachments may be routed so that the couplings are located near the cab, and the driver does not need to leave the machine to connect or disconnect those supply lines.
The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]
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