Standard-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. A standard-flow system commonly ranges from around 17-25 gallons per minute (gpm). It is the auxiliary system you'll find automated on nearly all skid steer models. These auxiliary systems work in tangent to power the most common unit attachments. Think accessories like buckets, hydraulic augers and hammers, with pressurizations averaging 3,000-3,500 pounds per square inch (psi).
Our four highly versatile skid steers, ranging from 68.4 to 70.7 hp, are up to whatever daunting challenge you throw at them. Each is built around one of YANMAR’s powerful, fuel-efficient Final Tier 4 diesel engines, so they won’t back down from even the toughest job. With rated operating capacities from 1,650 to 2,700 pounds, and two easy-to-operate QuickAttach™ mounting systems, these machines are also rugged enough to handle just about any attachment you need. Couple that with spacious, high-visibility operator’s areas – built for comfort and safety – and you can work a long day without feeling like you did.

The 272D XHP and 299D XHP high-flow models make 106 hp and 277 lbs.-ft. peak torque. Rated operating capacity is 3,600 lbs. for the 272D XHP and 3,185 lbs. for the 299D XHP at 35 percent of tipping load. Operating weight for the 272D XHP is 9,304 lbs. and 11,647 lbs. for the 299D XHP. Hydraulic systems deliver 40 gpm of flow at 4,061 psi, producing 94 hydraulic horsepower.


Visit our Cat Compact Loader Maintenance page on Cat.com. Take advantage of special offers on Cat Parts, shop for parts online, access maintenance schedules and get info on both tires and tracks. Also available for download is our latest Parts Reference Guide - listing out all part numbers required for the first 2,000+ hours of your Cat Skid Steer, Compact Track and Multi Terrain Loaders.


Horsepower: A unit's power capability that equals raising 550-foot-pounds per second, or 33,000-foot-pounds per minute. A machine's horsepower identifies the maximum power amount it's able to sustain. It is the most common reading for engine types, including skid steers. Certain manufacturers may choose also to include engine power, though the definition is operationally identical.
Skid steer loaders are four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. It can load earth into a truck, dig and move landscaping and building materials, clean roads, grind asphalt, clear the road from snow, and serve many other purposes.
The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
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