"Find out as much as you can about the job the skid steer is being put to," says Zupancic. "Get an idea of the dimensions of the site - especially the minimum dimensions. The worst thing for a contractor is to feel his rental provider hasn't given his business enough thought and has recommended a machine that won't fit within the most vital dimensions of the jobsite."
*Offer valid through March 2018 on leases for select compact construction machines. Offer available for qualifying customers in Ohio CAT sales territory only and cannot be combined with any other offers. Financing and published payment amounts are subject to credit approval through Cat Financial. Offer subject to machine availability. Models, work tools, and configurations shown do not necessarily reflect the exact model configuration used for promotional pricing. Payments are based on a tax lease with 0% downpayment. Lease provides 500 hours/year usage. Payments do not include tax, freight, set-up, document fees. Contact Ohio CAT for full details.
The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only 6 ft. tall and 3 ft. wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine.
Some models of skid steer now also have an automatic attachment changer mechanism. This allows a driver to change between a variety of terrain handling, shaping, and leveling tools without having to leave the machine, by using a hydraulic control mechanism to latch onto the attachments. Hydraulic supply lines to powered attachments may be routed so that the couplings are located near the cab, and the driver does not need to leave the machine to connect or disconnect those supply lines.

At Ziegler, you’ll experience industry-leading customer support that will help keep you on the job. Our Cat-certified technicians are equipped with the latest diagnostics, tools, and technology so your repair gets done quickly and gets done right. Plus, our large parts inventory and distribution network allow us to fill 98.8 percent of parts orders within 24 hours.
We are your one-stop-shop for used multi-terrain/compact loaders and used skid steer loaders. We will find the right equipment for your job - at a price that fits your budget. All of Butler’s used machinery is backed by our extensive parts and service network so we’ve got you covered and our higher standards don't have to come at a greater cost. That's why every machine in our used inventory is put through a rigorous inspection process before we put it on the market. We want to make sure that every piece of equipment with our name on it meets our standards.
Offer good for qualifying customers in Ziegler CAT service territory (Minnesota and Iowa). Payment shown is based on a 60-month lease, 500 hours usage per year (2,500 hours total), does not include sales tax, and is based on current interest rates. In Iowa, sales tax is based on machine sale price, not payment. Contact your Ziegler representative for details or to learn about buyout or lease extension options. Offer is subject to credit approval and may be changed or cancelled without notice.
Who likes dropping or spilling materials? No one. That’s why CASE’s innovative Ride Control™ feature is such a benefit. Just push a button to automatically steady the loader arm when traveling at elevated speeds and the machine automatically compensates with greater shock absorption and reduced loader arm bounce, so you can work faster than ever without spilling your load.
Offer good for qualifying customers in Ziegler CAT service territory (Minnesota and Iowa). Payment shown is based on a 60-month lease, 500 hours usage per year (2,500 hours total), does not include sales tax, and is based on current interest rates. In Iowa, sales tax is based on machine sale price, not payment. Contact your Ziegler representative for details or to learn about buyout or lease extension options. Offer is subject to credit approval and may be changed or cancelled without notice.
"Find out as much as you can about the job the skid steer is being put to," says Zupancic. "Get an idea of the dimensions of the site - especially the minimum dimensions. The worst thing for a contractor is to feel his rental provider hasn't given his business enough thought and has recommended a machine that won't fit within the most vital dimensions of the jobsite."
Horsepower: A unit's power capability that equals raising 550-foot-pounds per second, or 33,000-foot-pounds per minute. A machine's horsepower identifies the maximum power amount it's able to sustain. It is the most common reading for engine types, including skid steers. Certain manufacturers may choose also to include engine power, though the definition is operationally identical.
Skid steers are dual-powered through their diesel engines and hydraulic pumps and systems. Hydraulic systems use pressurized, or hydraulic, fluids to power their associated machinery, rather than other fuel sources or the raw flow of materials. They're a vital component to your machine's overall output and getting the best skid for your project operations and budget.

The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only 6 ft. tall and 3 ft. wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine.
One size does not fit all when it comes to skid steers. Bigger is not universally better, while smaller units come with their own limitations and maintenance details a savvy purchaser shouldn't overlook. It's important to consult skid-steer size charts to take into account three major variables: A unit's engine model, its horsepower and its rated operating capacity (ROC).

"Interior demolition is a good example where these machines excel, as the machine is small enough to access the inside of a building, yet powerful enough to use a hydraulic breaker attachment to demolish concrete and then switch to a grapple to remove the debris," says Rostberg. "Accessing in-between houses built closely together or through backyard gates and fences is another prime example of the usefulness of this size machine."


If you are a law firm who has been contacted by individuals identifying themselves as Carl Neagoy or Matthew Kicinski and seeking to collect debts from Compact Power Equipment, or receive a cashier’s check allegedly from Compact Power Equipment as payment of said claims, please be advised that those claims are fraudulent and documents are counterfeit. Any law firms seeking more information may contact legal_question@homedepot.com. Thank you.

The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]
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