Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.
Warren CAT is proud to offer a huge selection of Cat skid steers throughout the Oklahoma and Texas Territory for a wide variety of construction and industrial applications. Skid Steers deliver exceptional performance, versatility, ease of operation, serviceability, and come with unmatched Caterpillar customer support. If you need a machine that packs a powerful punch, the 272D XHP features the turbocharged Cat C3.8 engine with a gross power rating of 110 hp. The sealed and pressurized cab keeps dust and debris out while offering a wide-open, roomy configuration for maximum comfort and ease of operation. The speed-sensitive ride control system of any skid steer provides the smoothest possible ride on even the most rugged terrain, which also gives the operator greater load control.
Opportune financing: Many skid steer dealers offer flexible payment plans and bi-yearly financing terms for those who qualify. At participating Cat dealers, current offers allow you to purchase a new skid steer loader with a two-year standard warranty at 0-percent APR. You can further mitigate financial risks through Cat Insurance, additional services and resources to protect your investment.
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
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