The wheels on a skid steer typically have no steering mechanism, they are in a fixed, straight line relative to the body of the machine.  By turning the left and right wheel pairs at different speeds, the machine turns by skidding, or dragging its wheels across the ground.  The rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine.  This skidding motion tears up the ground on which the machine operates.
The new Cat 272D skid steer and 299D compact track loader are joined by high-performance counterparts, the 272D XHP and 299D XHP, which are the largest, most powerful skid steer and compact track loaders Caterpillar has built. The electronically controlled Cat C3.8 engine, which meets EPA Tier 4 Interim and European Stage IIIB emissions standards, is equipped with the Cat NOx Reduction System. 
Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."
The skid steer loader’s remarkable agility and versatility makes it one of the more valuable pieces of equipment at a jobsite, even though it is usually one of the smallest! NMC CAT is your source for Cat® skid steer loaders for sale in Nebraska that will exceed your expectations in terms of reliability, durability, fuel efficiency and performance. Cat skid steer loaders give you the flexibility you need to maximize productivity and minimize operating costs.
Ohio Cat is the proven leader in compact construction skid steer loader equipment. From the moment we hand over the key to your skid loader to the point where you need to maintain your machine, you can count on Ohio Cat to be there to make your job easier and your operations more efficient. Grow your construction equipment fleet or run a skid steer or track loader from Cat while these specials are available. To learn more about skid steer loaders, ask your sales rep about skid loader model information or visit cat.com new skid steer loader machines.
How does Caterpillar® compare to the competition? If you are considering purchasing a skid steer loader, you want to be knowledgeable about your options. Cat skid steer loaders are compact machines with the power and versatility to tackle big jobs. High performance power train, advanced hydraulic systems and traditional Cat reliability improve your productivity in the toughest working conditions.
Zupancic says it's all about the size of the site and the use the skid steer is put to. "These construction and jobsite applications require a little more power and bucket size, but are still in a confined enough space that contractors cannot bring in the big machines," he explains. "Sometimes the operator doesn't need the extra muscle of a larger skid-steer loader and finds it more economical to have a 50- to 70-hp machine."
Save time and money by using a skid steer loader to shoulder the weight of time-consuming, labor-intensive tasks. Sellers on eBay offer a wide selection of these small and incredibly versatile laborsaving machines, including models from big-name brands such as John Deere, Caterpillar, and Case. With such a large choice of heavy equipment, in new, used, and refurbished condition, it is easy to find exactly what you need, whether it is for domestic or commercial use.
Usage: Consider all the details of your project and what you expect to use the skid steer for, from loading and hauling to drilling, boring or excavation. How many hours a day will the steer be used, and what are the operating load weights or capacities you'll need to match expected workloads? Does your desired unit have an engine model and horsepower fitting your projected use?
Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.
We are your one-stop-shop for used multi-terrain/compact loaders and used skid steer loaders. We will find the right equipment for your job - at a price that fits your budget. All of Butler’s used machinery is backed by our extensive parts and service network so we’ve got you covered and our higher standards don't have to come at a greater cost. That's why every machine in our used inventory is put through a rigorous inspection process before we put it on the market. We want to make sure that every piece of equipment with our name on it meets our standards.
Rakes: For land clearing, sorting, digging and aerating tasks, there are few skid-steer attachments that do as much for industrial-grade landscaping as rakes. These high-caliber pieces come in a variety of manufactured options with details tailored to your land-clearing needs. From hardened teeth to small and large-framed hoppers and grapples that collect mulch and debris, rakes are a unique attachment for any party doing heavy operational work in the outdoors.

Skid steer loaders are four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. It can load earth into a truck, dig and move landscaping and building materials, clean roads, grind asphalt, clear the road from snow, and serve many other purposes.
One size does not fit all when it comes to skid steers. Bigger is not universally better, while smaller units come with their own limitations and maintenance details a savvy purchaser shouldn't overlook. It's important to consult skid-steer size charts to take into account three major variables: A unit's engine model, its horsepower and its rated operating capacity (ROC).
A skid-steer loader can sometimes be used in place of a large excavator by digging a hole from the inside. The skid loader first digs a ramp leading to the edge of the desired excavation. It then uses the ramp to carry material out of the hole. The skid loader reshapes the ramp making it steeper and longer as the excavation deepens. This method is particularly useful for digging under a structure where overhead clearance does not allow for the boom of a large excavator, such as digging a basement under an existing house. Several companies make backhoe attachments for skid-steers. These are more effective for digging in a small area than the method above and can work in the same environments. Other applications may consist of transporting raw material around a job site, or assisting in the rough grading process.
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