The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only 6 ft. tall and 3 ft. wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine.

The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
No mechanical transmission: A premium hydraulic motor powers each side of a skid steer loader. These two motors each connect to a partner sprocket, and each of these sprockets then connects through industrial chains to the wheels. This simple yet streamlined system allows for the power generated by the motors to evenly distribute to the wheels, as well as reduce gear wear and increase wheel torque capabilities. The no-mechanical transmission design is as timeless as technology gets.
An extended reach design uses multiple hinges and parallel lifting bars on the loader arm, with the main pivot points towards the center or front of the machine. This allows the loader arm to have much greater operating height while retaining a compact design, and allows the vertical movement to be less of an arc and more straight-up vertical, to keep the bucket forward of the operator's cab, allowing safe dumping into tall containers or vehicles.
Standard-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. A standard-flow system commonly ranges from around 17-25 gallons per minute (gpm). It is the auxiliary system you'll find automated on nearly all skid steer models. These auxiliary systems work in tangent to power the most common unit attachments. Think accessories like buckets, hydraulic augers and hammers, with pressurizations averaging 3,000-3,500 pounds per square inch (psi).

Some models of skid steer now also have an automatic attachment changer mechanism. This allows a driver to change between a variety of terrain handling, shaping, and leveling tools without having to leave the machine, by using a hydraulic control mechanism to latch onto the attachments. Hydraulic supply lines to powered attachments may be routed so that the couplings are located near the cab, and the driver does not need to leave the machine to connect or disconnect those supply lines.
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