The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
Jobsite dimensions are one of the greatest factors to know to fit the skid steer to the job. "Understanding physical limitations of the work area often dictates the class that may be used in the application," says Dennis Turney, Hyundai Construction Equipment. "The next consideration would be the lifting height or dumping height requirement, along with the capacity of the job. Finally, hydraulic capacity needs to known in order to operate any hydraulic attachments.

With nearly 50 years of serving clients in the construction, landscaping and forestry industries, Butler Machinery is the professional’s choice for used skid steer loaders in South Dakota and North Dakota. Our used inventory is constantly expanding, and it features a wide selection of quality equipment for every budget and application. We carry products by both Cat® and allied brands including Bobcat and Case. Looking for something specific, or need help choosing the best unit for you? Call a Butler Machinery sales rep today for immediate assistance. You can also visit us in person at one of our many locations throughout North and South Dakota.
Some of the biggest names in the world produce skid steer loaders, including Bobcat, New Holland and Kubota. Consider a Boxer mini skid for domestic and small-scale applications, or invest in a powerful John Deere or Caterpillar loader for commercial use.  Even if you choose to buy a second-hand machine, you have the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have bought something built to last.
Rakes: For land clearing, sorting, digging and aerating tasks, there are few skid-steer attachments that do as much for industrial-grade landscaping as rakes. These high-caliber pieces come in a variety of manufactured options with details tailored to your land-clearing needs. From hardened teeth to small and large-framed hoppers and grapples that collect mulch and debris, rakes are a unique attachment for any party doing heavy operational work in the outdoors.
Extended two-year warranty: The quality inspections, coverage and care that comes with skid steer warranties is hard to beat. Caterpillar's twenty-four-month or 2,000-hours warranty offers twice the coverage on compact machines like skid steers, protecting against unexpected repairs or maintenance. What's more, Cat Financial Services bolsters warranties with a complete suite of Equipment Protection Plans (EPP), customizable when starting at 36 months, as well as Customer Support Agreements and Engine Warranty Registration.

The 272D XHP and 299D XHP high-flow models make 106 hp and 277 lbs.-ft. peak torque. Rated operating capacity is 3,600 lbs. for the 272D XHP and 3,185 lbs. for the 299D XHP at 35 percent of tipping load. Operating weight for the 272D XHP is 9,304 lbs. and 11,647 lbs. for the 299D XHP. Hydraulic systems deliver 40 gpm of flow at 4,061 psi, producing 94 hydraulic horsepower.
The Butler Machinery difference doesn’t stop once you’ve purchased a used skid steer loader from us. We offer comprehensive after-sale support from one of the most qualified service teams in the area. As the Dakotas’ only authorized Cat dealer, we provide factory-trained service that truly knows Cat equipment. In the event of a breakdown, we can deliver on-site emergency diagnostics and repairs that get you back up and running faster.
The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
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