The compact Bobcat® S70 skid-steer loader is small enough to get in the tight spots, yet tough enough to get you out. This agile little workhorse is only six feet tall and three feet wide — the ideal size for scooting through narrow doorways, corridors, aisles, alleys and gates, and for working under low ceilings. It's the perfect loader whenever the job is too big for a shovel or the space is too small for a larger machine — in backyards, barns, construction sites and demolition areas. With more than 20 Bobcat® attachments to choose from, the S70 is a multi-attachment carrier that's ready to take on just about any job.

You can also contact us for more information and to inquire about maintenance requirements and efficiency ratings. We’re proud to offer the advanced lineup of Cat skid steer loaders for sale and know that we have the right model for your business. Simply let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll point you in the right direction. Cat skid steer loaders come in a range of sizes and capacities to fit all loads, tasks and budgets.
Skid Steer loaders offer great versatility. Due to their compact size and zero-radius turning circle, it is possible to use them in confined spaces where many other types of heavy machinery cannot reach. They are ideal for landscaping in parks and yards, or moving earth around a construction site; and in some cases it is possible to use them in place of a full-scale excavator to dig holes. Sellers on eBay also offer specialized buckets and attachments for clearing snow, grinding tree stumps, mowing grass, or digging trenches. With so many practical applications, skid steer loaders represent an excellent investment for small businesses looking to streamline some of their methods and improve overall workforce efficiency, and they are also useful for homeowners or farmers with a lot of land to maintain.
Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.
At Ziegler, you’ll experience industry-leading customer support that will help keep you on the job. Our Cat-certified technicians are equipped with the latest diagnostics, tools, and technology so your repair gets done quickly and gets done right. Plus, our large parts inventory and distribution network allow us to fill 98.8 percent of parts orders within 24 hours.
Rakes: For land clearing, sorting, digging and aerating tasks, there are few skid-steer attachments that do as much for industrial-grade landscaping as rakes. These high-caliber pieces come in a variety of manufactured options with details tailored to your land-clearing needs. From hardened teeth to small and large-framed hoppers and grapples that collect mulch and debris, rakes are a unique attachment for any party doing heavy operational work in the outdoors.

No mechanical transmission: A premium hydraulic motor powers each side of a skid steer loader. These two motors each connect to a partner sprocket, and each of these sprockets then connects through industrial chains to the wheels. This simple yet streamlined system allows for the power generated by the motors to evenly distribute to the wheels, as well as reduce gear wear and increase wheel torque capabilities. The no-mechanical transmission design is as timeless as technology gets.

Who likes dropping or spilling materials? No one. That’s why CASE’s innovative Ride Control™ feature is such a benefit. Just push a button to automatically steady the loader arm when traveling at elevated speeds and the machine automatically compensates with greater shock absorption and reduced loader arm bounce, so you can work faster than ever without spilling your load.


The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]
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