High-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. Upgrading a skid steer to a high-flow auxiliary hydraulics package means enhanced attachment options, run times and productivity. While they still operate under the same standard pressurization — 3,000-3,500 psi, they increase the pressure flow rate up to 38-40 gpm. High-flow systems can be added on to new skid steers purchased directly from a manufacturer or built into used steers. They're necessary when project attachments require high-flow rates in order to work, such as rock saws or landscaping mulchers and shredders.
This machine size's ROC allows it to lift the heaviest loads, such as moving pallets of brick or dumping loads of dirt into the back of trucks. "These machines also have the horsepower and hydraulic flow to tackle tough jobs and attachments," says Rostberg. "Attachments that perform best with a high-flow machine, such as a wheel saw or planer for road construction or a forestry cutter for site preparation, work best with these machines."
The skid steer loader’s remarkable agility and versatility makes it one of the more valuable pieces of equipment at a jobsite, even though it is usually one of the smallest! NMC CAT is your source for Cat® skid steer loaders for sale in Nebraska that will exceed your expectations in terms of reliability, durability, fuel efficiency and performance. Cat skid steer loaders give you the flexibility you need to maximize productivity and minimize operating costs.

Sellers on eBay offer branded heavy machinery and construction equipment, including refurbished and older models at amazing discounts. Taking advantage of these great deals means it is possible for small businesses and homeowners to own a loader that might otherwise be too expensive. Search the extensive inventory now to find something that meets your requirements, and discover the countless ways a skid steer loader improves your operational efficiency, saving you labor, time, and money.    
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
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