Horsepower: A unit's power capability that equals raising 550-foot-pounds per second, or 33,000-foot-pounds per minute. A machine's horsepower identifies the maximum power amount it's able to sustain. It is the most common reading for engine types, including skid steers. Certain manufacturers may choose also to include engine power, though the definition is operationally identical.
No mechanical transmission: A premium hydraulic motor powers each side of a skid steer loader. These two motors each connect to a partner sprocket, and each of these sprockets then connects through industrial chains to the wheels. This simple yet streamlined system allows for the power generated by the motors to evenly distribute to the wheels, as well as reduce gear wear and increase wheel torque capabilities. The no-mechanical transmission design is as timeless as technology gets.
The conventional bucket of many skid loaders can be replaced with a variety of specialized buckets or attachments, many powered by the loader's hydraulic system. These include backhoe, hydraulic breaker, pallet forks, angle broom, sweeper, auger, mower, snow blower, stump grinder, tree spade, trencher, dumping hopper, pavement miller, ripper, tillers, grapple, tilt, roller, snow blade, wheel saw, cement mixer, and wood chipper machine.
Skid Steer loaders offer great versatility. Due to their compact size and zero-radius turning circle, it is possible to use them in confined spaces where many other types of heavy machinery cannot reach. They are ideal for landscaping in parks and yards, or moving earth around a construction site; and in some cases it is possible to use them in place of a full-scale excavator to dig holes. Sellers on eBay also offer specialized buckets and attachments for clearing snow, grinding tree stumps, mowing grass, or digging trenches. With so many practical applications, skid steer loaders represent an excellent investment for small businesses looking to streamline some of their methods and improve overall workforce efficiency, and they are also useful for homeowners or farmers with a lot of land to maintain.
When it comes time to buy your new or used skid steer, attachments can't be an afterthought. They're engineered for specific purposes and are meant to be installed with particular steer units. When matched correctly, they complete a project in the smoothest and most efficient manner. Here, we've compiled a list of the most common skid-steer attachments for you to have on hand at your work site:
No mechanical transmission: A premium hydraulic motor powers each side of a skid steer loader. These two motors each connect to a partner sprocket, and each of these sprockets then connects through industrial chains to the wheels. This simple yet streamlined system allows for the power generated by the motors to evenly distribute to the wheels, as well as reduce gear wear and increase wheel torque capabilities. The no-mechanical transmission design is as timeless as technology gets.
Backhoes: For superior digging and excavation with your skid steer, nothing beats a backhoe. These attachments are controlled from inside the cab, designed and engineered to allow digging and shifting from the operator’s seat. Certain new skid steer models can come equipped with optional auxiliary hydraulic backhoe lines for attaching further hammers, augers, thumbs and other accessories for maximum digging utility.
The new Cat 272D skid steer and 299D compact track loader are joined by high-performance counterparts, the 272D XHP and 299D XHP, which are the largest, most powerful skid steer and compact track loaders Caterpillar has built. The electronically controlled Cat C3.8 engine, which meets EPA Tier 4 Interim and European Stage IIIB emissions standards, is equipped with the Cat NOx Reduction System. 
A skid-steer loader can sometimes be used in place of a large excavator by digging a hole from the inside. The skid loader first digs a ramp leading to the edge of the desired excavation. It then uses the ramp to carry material out of the hole. The skid loader reshapes the ramp making it steeper and longer as the excavation deepens. This method is particularly useful for digging under a structure where overhead clearance does not allow for the boom of a large excavator, such as digging a basement under an existing house. Several companies make backhoe attachments for skid-steers. These are more effective for digging in a small area than the method above and can work in the same environments. Other applications may consist of transporting raw material around a job site, or assisting in the rough grading process.
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