Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."

Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."

Usage: Consider all the details of your project and what you expect to use the skid steer for, from loading and hauling to drilling, boring or excavation. How many hours a day will the steer be used, and what are the operating load weights or capacities you'll need to match expected workloads? Does your desired unit have an engine model and horsepower fitting your projected use?

Our four highly versatile skid steers, ranging from 68.4 to 70.7 hp, are up to whatever daunting challenge you throw at them. Each is built around one of YANMAR’s powerful, fuel-efficient Final Tier 4 diesel engines, so they won’t back down from even the toughest job. With rated operating capacities from 1,650 to 2,700 pounds, and two easy-to-operate QuickAttach™ mounting systems, these machines are also rugged enough to handle just about any attachment you need. Couple that with spacious, high-visibility operator’s areas – built for comfort and safety – and you can work a long day without feeling like you did.
The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]
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