Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.
Backhoes: For superior digging and excavation with your skid steer, nothing beats a backhoe. These attachments are controlled from inside the cab, designed and engineered to allow digging and shifting from the operator’s seat. Certain new skid steer models can come equipped with optional auxiliary hydraulic backhoe lines for attaching further hammers, augers, thumbs and other accessories for maximum digging utility.
How does Caterpillar® compare to the competition? If you are considering purchasing a skid steer loader, you want to be knowledgeable about your options. Cat skid steer loaders are compact machines with the power and versatility to tackle big jobs. High performance power train, advanced hydraulic systems and traditional Cat reliability improve your productivity in the toughest working conditions.
This machine size's ROC allows it to lift the heaviest loads, such as moving pallets of brick or dumping loads of dirt into the back of trucks. "These machines also have the horsepower and hydraulic flow to tackle tough jobs and attachments," says Rostberg. "Attachments that perform best with a high-flow machine, such as a wheel saw or planer for road construction or a forestry cutter for site preparation, work best with these machines."
Designed for the toughest jobs in the roughest conditions, a Cat skid steer can be the workhorse of your operation. With big iron features and operating capacities ranging from 1,400 to 3,600 lbs., its stability and lifting performance provide excellent material handling. The new generation of Cat skid steer loaders feature improved controls, greater fuel efficiency, and a wide range of tooling options.
Some of the biggest names in the world produce skid steer loaders, including Bobcat, New Holland and Kubota. Consider a Boxer mini skid for domestic and small-scale applications, or invest in a powerful John Deere or Caterpillar loader for commercial use.  Even if you choose to buy a second-hand machine, you have the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have bought something built to last.
Operate the skid steer loader the way you like through the simple touch of a button on our EZ-EH controls. Quickly switch between personalized settings for speed and control customization; program up to nine different presets to recall operator settings for different jobs and different operators at the touch of a button. There’s also an intuitive lockout menu and rocker switch to easily alternate between CASE “H” and “ISO” patterns.
One solution does not fit all. CASE carefully considered each machine’s application, life expectancy, maintenance needs and operators. That’s why every CASE skid steer loader features a proven Tier 4 Final solution that is tailored for that model. CASE Tier 4-certified equipment is easier to maintain and, unlike competitive models, won't require you to master additional maintenance procedures. In fact, most CASE machines have maintenance-free emission solutions, so you can stay focused on your work—and not maintaining your machine.
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
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