Jobsite dimensions are one of the greatest factors to know to fit the skid steer to the job. "Understanding physical limitations of the work area often dictates the class that may be used in the application," says Dennis Turney, Hyundai Construction Equipment. "The next consideration would be the lifting height or dumping height requirement, along with the capacity of the job. Finally, hydraulic capacity needs to known in order to operate any hydraulic attachments.


Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.


The wheels on a skid steer typically have no steering mechanism, they are in a fixed, straight line relative to the body of the machine.  By turning the left and right wheel pairs at different speeds, the machine turns by skidding, or dragging its wheels across the ground.  The rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine.  This skidding motion tears up the ground on which the machine operates.
Ohio Cat is the proven leader in compact construction skid steer loader equipment. From the moment we hand over the key to your skid loader to the point where you need to maintain your machine, you can count on Ohio Cat to be there to make your job easier and your operations more efficient. Grow your construction equipment fleet or run a skid steer or track loader from Cat while these specials are available. To learn more about skid steer loaders, ask your sales rep about skid loader model information or visit cat.com new skid steer loader machines.
Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]
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