The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]
For example, a homeowner or contractor working on an established lawn might be best served with a tracked machine that will cause less damage - and less rework - to the lawn, saving time and money. Or, much like the small skid-steer loaders, a mini track loader is an excellent way to access narrow or tight areas, such as through a backyard gate or in between buildings built closely together.
Rakes: For land clearing, sorting, digging and aerating tasks, there are few skid-steer attachments that do as much for industrial-grade landscaping as rakes. These high-caliber pieces come in a variety of manufactured options with details tailored to your land-clearing needs. From hardened teeth to small and large-framed hoppers and grapples that collect mulch and debris, rakes are a unique attachment for any party doing heavy operational work in the outdoors.
Standard-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. A standard-flow system commonly ranges from around 17-25 gallons per minute (gpm). It is the auxiliary system you'll find automated on nearly all skid steer models. These auxiliary systems work in tangent to power the most common unit attachments. Think accessories like buckets, hydraulic augers and hammers, with pressurizations averaging 3,000-3,500 pounds per square inch (psi).
High-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. Upgrading a skid steer to a high-flow auxiliary hydraulics package means enhanced attachment options, run times and productivity. While they still operate under the same standard pressurization — 3,000-3,500 psi, they increase the pressure flow rate up to 38-40 gpm. High-flow systems can be added on to new skid steers purchased directly from a manufacturer or built into used steers. They're necessary when project attachments require high-flow rates in order to work, such as rock saws or landscaping mulchers and shredders.
The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
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