With nearly 50 years of serving clients in the construction, landscaping and forestry industries, Butler Machinery is the professional’s choice for used skid steer loaders in South Dakota and North Dakota. Our used inventory is constantly expanding, and it features a wide selection of quality equipment for every budget and application. We carry products by both Cat® and allied brands including Bobcat and Case. Looking for something specific, or need help choosing the best unit for you? Call a Butler Machinery sales rep today for immediate assistance. You can also visit us in person at one of our many locations throughout North and South Dakota.
"Knowing the specific applications the customer would like to perform will help a rental business determine the size and power of machine needed to most efficiently complete the tasks," says Rostberg. "Asking questions and getting to the core of the customer's work will help determine this. Also, while inquiring about the customer's needs, a rental business might discover opportunities to rent attachments that will help the customer more quickly and efficiently complete their job."

"Interior demolition is a good example where these machines excel, as the machine is small enough to access the inside of a building, yet powerful enough to use a hydraulic breaker attachment to demolish concrete and then switch to a grapple to remove the debris," says Rostberg. "Accessing in-between houses built closely together or through backyard gates and fences is another prime example of the usefulness of this size machine."


Cat offers some of the latest electronic, computer-analyzed fleet communication software and oversight in the industry. Using both remote and on-site technology, a Fleet Management Solutions Package provides security and maintenance reports for all included equipment, as well as production and efficiency reports to maximize your skid steer outputs better.
The wheels on a skid steer typically have no steering mechanism, they are in a fixed, straight line relative to the body of the machine.  By turning the left and right wheel pairs at different speeds, the machine turns by skidding, or dragging its wheels across the ground.  The rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine.  This skidding motion tears up the ground on which the machine operates.
Jobsite dimensions are one of the greatest factors to know to fit the skid steer to the job. "Understanding physical limitations of the work area often dictates the class that may be used in the application," says Dennis Turney, Hyundai Construction Equipment. "The next consideration would be the lifting height or dumping height requirement, along with the capacity of the job. Finally, hydraulic capacity needs to known in order to operate any hydraulic attachments.
One size does not fit all when it comes to skid steers. Bigger is not universally better, while smaller units come with their own limitations and maintenance details a savvy purchaser shouldn't overlook. It's important to consult skid-steer size charts to take into account three major variables: A unit's engine model, its horsepower and its rated operating capacity (ROC).
One solution does not fit all. CASE carefully considered each machine’s application, life expectancy, maintenance needs and operators. That’s why every CASE skid steer loader features a proven Tier 4 Final solution that is tailored for that model. CASE Tier 4-certified equipment is easier to maintain and, unlike competitive models, won't require you to master additional maintenance procedures. In fact, most CASE machines have maintenance-free emission solutions, so you can stay focused on your work—and not maintaining your machine.
Usage: Consider all the details of your project and what you expect to use the skid steer for, from loading and hauling to drilling, boring or excavation. How many hours a day will the steer be used, and what are the operating load weights or capacities you'll need to match expected workloads? Does your desired unit have an engine model and horsepower fitting your projected use?
An extended reach design uses multiple hinges and parallel lifting bars on the loader arm, with the main pivot points towards the center or front of the machine. This allows the loader arm to have much greater operating height while retaining a compact design, and allows the vertical movement to be less of an arc and more straight-up vertical, to keep the bucket forward of the operator's cab, allowing safe dumping into tall containers or vehicles.
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