Backhoes: For superior digging and excavation with your skid steer, nothing beats a backhoe. These attachments are controlled from inside the cab, designed and engineered to allow digging and shifting from the operator’s seat. Certain new skid steer models can come equipped with optional auxiliary hydraulic backhoe lines for attaching further hammers, augers, thumbs and other accessories for maximum digging utility.
You can also contact us for more information and to inquire about maintenance requirements and efficiency ratings. We’re proud to offer the advanced lineup of Cat skid steer loaders for sale and know that we have the right model for your business. Simply let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll point you in the right direction. Cat skid steer loaders come in a range of sizes and capacities to fit all loads, tasks and budgets.

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Zupancic says it's all about the size of the site and the use the skid steer is put to. "These construction and jobsite applications require a little more power and bucket size, but are still in a confined enough space that contractors cannot bring in the big machines," he explains. "Sometimes the operator doesn't need the extra muscle of a larger skid-steer loader and finds it more economical to have a 50- to 70-hp machine."
Usage: Consider all the details of your project and what you expect to use the skid steer for, from loading and hauling to drilling, boring or excavation. How many hours a day will the steer be used, and what are the operating load weights or capacities you'll need to match expected workloads? Does your desired unit have an engine model and horsepower fitting your projected use?
This machine size's ROC allows it to lift the heaviest loads, such as moving pallets of brick or dumping loads of dirt into the back of trucks. "These machines also have the horsepower and hydraulic flow to tackle tough jobs and attachments," says Rostberg. "Attachments that perform best with a high-flow machine, such as a wheel saw or planer for road construction or a forestry cutter for site preparation, work best with these machines."
Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]
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