When it comes time to buy your new or used skid steer, attachments can't be an afterthought. They're engineered for specific purposes and are meant to be installed with particular steer units. When matched correctly, they complete a project in the smoothest and most efficient manner. Here, we've compiled a list of the most common skid-steer attachments for you to have on hand at your work site:
Skid steers are dual-powered through their diesel engines and hydraulic pumps and systems. Hydraulic systems use pressurized, or hydraulic, fluids to power their associated machinery, rather than other fuel sources or the raw flow of materials. They're a vital component to your machine's overall output and getting the best skid for your project operations and budget.
Usage: Consider all the details of your project and what you expect to use the skid steer for, from loading and hauling to drilling, boring or excavation. How many hours a day will the steer be used, and what are the operating load weights or capacities you'll need to match expected workloads? Does your desired unit have an engine model and horsepower fitting your projected use?

One size does not fit all when it comes to skid steers. Bigger is not universally better, while smaller units come with their own limitations and maintenance details a savvy purchaser shouldn't overlook. It's important to consult skid-steer size charts to take into account three major variables: A unit's engine model, its horsepower and its rated operating capacity (ROC).
The conventional bucket of many skid loaders can be replaced with a variety of specialized buckets or attachments, many powered by the loader's hydraulic system. These include backhoe, hydraulic breaker, pallet forks, angle broom, sweeper, auger, mower, snow blower, stump grinder, tree spade, trencher, dumping hopper, pavement miller, ripper, tillers, grapple, tilt, roller, snow blade, wheel saw, cement mixer, and wood chipper machine.
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