The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
When it comes time to buy your new or used skid steer, attachments can't be an afterthought. They're engineered for specific purposes and are meant to be installed with particular steer units. When matched correctly, they complete a project in the smoothest and most efficient manner. Here, we've compiled a list of the most common skid-steer attachments for you to have on hand at your work site:
Offer good for qualifying customers in Ziegler CAT service territory (Minnesota and Iowa). Payment shown is based on a 60-month lease, 500 hours usage per year (2,500 hours total), does not include sales tax, and is based on current interest rates. In Iowa, sales tax is based on machine sale price, not payment. Contact your Ziegler representative for details or to learn about buyout or lease extension options. Offer is subject to credit approval and may be changed or cancelled without notice.

Backhoes: For superior digging and excavation with your skid steer, nothing beats a backhoe. These attachments are controlled from inside the cab, designed and engineered to allow digging and shifting from the operator’s seat. Certain new skid steer models can come equipped with optional auxiliary hydraulic backhoe lines for attaching further hammers, augers, thumbs and other accessories for maximum digging utility.

The 272D XHP and 299D XHP high-flow models make 106 hp and 277 lbs.-ft. peak torque. Rated operating capacity is 3,600 lbs. for the 272D XHP and 3,185 lbs. for the 299D XHP at 35 percent of tipping load. Operating weight for the 272D XHP is 9,304 lbs. and 11,647 lbs. for the 299D XHP. Hydraulic systems deliver 40 gpm of flow at 4,061 psi, producing 94 hydraulic horsepower.
Backhoes: For superior digging and excavation with your skid steer, nothing beats a backhoe. These attachments are controlled from inside the cab, designed and engineered to allow digging and shifting from the operator’s seat. Certain new skid steer models can come equipped with optional auxiliary hydraulic backhoe lines for attaching further hammers, augers, thumbs and other accessories for maximum digging utility.

Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]
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