Skid Steer loaders offer great versatility. Due to their compact size and zero-radius turning circle, it is possible to use them in confined spaces where many other types of heavy machinery cannot reach. They are ideal for landscaping in parks and yards, or moving earth around a construction site; and in some cases it is possible to use them in place of a full-scale excavator to dig holes. Sellers on eBay also offer specialized buckets and attachments for clearing snow, grinding tree stumps, mowing grass, or digging trenches. With so many practical applications, skid steer loaders represent an excellent investment for small businesses looking to streamline some of their methods and improve overall workforce efficiency, and they are also useful for homeowners or farmers with a lot of land to maintain.
"Interior demolition is a good example where these machines excel, as the machine is small enough to access the inside of a building, yet powerful enough to use a hydraulic breaker attachment to demolish concrete and then switch to a grapple to remove the debris," says Rostberg. "Accessing in-between houses built closely together or through backyard gates and fences is another prime example of the usefulness of this size machine."
The 272D XHP and 299D XHP high-flow models make 106 hp and 277 lbs.-ft. peak torque. Rated operating capacity is 3,600 lbs. for the 272D XHP and 3,185 lbs. for the 299D XHP at 35 percent of tipping load. Operating weight for the 272D XHP is 9,304 lbs. and 11,647 lbs. for the 299D XHP. Hydraulic systems deliver 40 gpm of flow at 4,061 psi, producing 94 hydraulic horsepower.

Growing businesses looking to get the best return on their investment can benefit from purchasing a used Cat skid steer loader from Butler Machinery. The cost savings of buying used puts the legendary quality and performance of Cat equipment within reach of smaller and medium-sized organizations on a limited budget. In today’s economy, it takes the best equipment to serve your clients as diligently as possible while maintaining low overhead costs — Cat skid steer loaders deliver low costs of ownership and unbeatable uptime. Many of our newer pre-owned units are still under the original manufacturer’s warranty. For older units, preventative maintenance plans and extended warranties are available to keep your purchase running its best without breaking the bank.


You can also contact us for more information and to inquire about maintenance requirements and efficiency ratings. We’re proud to offer the advanced lineup of Cat skid steer loaders for sale and know that we have the right model for your business. Simply let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll point you in the right direction. Cat skid steer loaders come in a range of sizes and capacities to fit all loads, tasks and budgets.
The wheels on a skid steer typically have no steering mechanism, they are in a fixed, straight line relative to the body of the machine.  By turning the left and right wheel pairs at different speeds, the machine turns by skidding, or dragging its wheels across the ground.  The rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine.  This skidding motion tears up the ground on which the machine operates.
Outfitting new and old equipment with Tier 4's suite of equipment technology is another way to improve the lifespan and efficiency of a skid steer purchase. Tier 4 Technology brings innovative, personalized upgrades to the engine electronics, fuel and air systems of a unit, explicitly based on that unit's engine size, routine tasks and jobsite location.
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
×