Buckets: What is a skid steer without its bucket? The two go hand-in-hand across the most basic of skid-steer applications — and through the most complex. Engineered buckets attach seamlessly to their skid steers and aid in digging, loading and transferring of carried materials. Buckets can also come with a range of specialized teeth, heights, widths and bucket capacities to further compound their digging and transportation abilities, made to handle various materials like snow, rock, grapple buckets and combinations.
You can also contact us for more information and to inquire about maintenance requirements and efficiency ratings. We’re proud to offer the advanced lineup of Cat skid steer loaders for sale and know that we have the right model for your business. Simply let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll point you in the right direction. Cat skid steer loaders come in a range of sizes and capacities to fit all loads, tasks and budgets.
Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."
Enhanced high-flow auxiliary hydraulics package. To get the most from your pound-per-square inch flow, enhanced high-flow packages can be installed into your skid steer to boost their output to 4,000 psi. They maintain similar gallon-per-minute rates as their high-flow counterparts, and are required for attachments that need the maximum hydraulic pressure allotment to run.
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
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